HTML Standard Tracker

Filter

File a bug

SVNBugCommentTime (UTC)
743617903Define what happens with our HTTP headers in redirects. (Hopefully HTTP defines what happens with most headers.)2012-10-05 23:02
@@ -8483,24 +8483,26 @@ is conforming depends on which specs apply, and leaves it at that. -->
       redirect</dfn>, then the user agent must resume this algorithm
       from the <i>main step</i>, but using the target of the redirect
       as the resource to fetch, rather than the original resource.</p>
 
      </dd>
 
      <dt>Otherwise</dt>
 
      <dd>
 
-      <p>First, apply any relevant requirements for redirects (such as
-      showing any appropriate prompts). Then, redo <i>main step</i>,
-      but using the target of the redirect as the resource to fetch,
-      rather than the original resource.</p>
+      <p>First, apply any relevant requirements for redirects (such as showing any appropriate
+      prompts). Then, redo <i>main step</i>, but using the target of the redirect as the resource to
+      fetch, rather than the original resource. For HTTP requests, the new request must include the
+      same headers as the original request, except for headers for which other requirements are
+      specified (such as the <code title="http-host">Host</code> header). <a
+      href="#refsHTTP">[HTTP]</a></p>
 
       <p class="note">The HTTP specification requires that 301, 302,
       and 307 redirects, when applied to methods other than the safe
       methods, not be followed without user confirmation. That would
       be an appropriate prompt for the purposes of the requirement in
       the paragraph above. <a href="#refsHTTP">[HTTP]</a></p>
 
      </dd>
 
     </dl>

|